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Margaret Booth-Jones, PhD

Specialty: Clinical Psychology
Program: Supportive Care Medicine

Call 1-888-MOFFITT
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Call 1-888-MOFFITT
(1-888-663-3488)


Locations: Moffitt Cancer Center
Overview

Dr. Booth-Jones' clinical interests are cognitive changes in cancer patients and their subsequent impact on psychosocial function and emotional well-being. She is an Assistant Professor of Oncology and Psychiatry at the University of South Florida and a Neuropsychologist in the Supportive Care Program at Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute.

Education & Training

Fellowship:

  • University of Florida - Clinical and Health Psychology

Residency:

  • University of Chicago Medical Center - Psychiatry

Medical School:

  • University of Florida(PhD, - PhD)
Participating Trials

If you believe you are eligible for one of these trials or studies, please call
813-745-6100 or toll-free 1-800-679-0775.

Publications

  • Barata A, Gonzalez BD, Zhou JM, Kim J, Hoogland AI, El-Jawahri A, Booth-Jones M, Jim HSL. Associations among depression, antidepressants, survival and quality of life in hematopoietic cell transplant recipients. Bone Marrow Transplant. 2020 May. Pubmedid: 32398786.
  • Hoogland AI, Nelson AM, Gonzalez BD, Small BJ, Breen EC, Sutton SK, Syrjala KL, Bower JE, Pidala J, Booth-Jones M, Jacobsen PB, Jim HSL. Worsening cognitive performance is associated with increases in systemic inflammation following hematopoietic cell transplantation. Brain Behav Immun. 2019 Aug.80:308-314. Pubmedid: 30953767. Pmcid: PMC6660393.
  • Hoogland AI, Nelson AM, Small BJ, Hyland KA, Gonzalez BD, Booth-Jones M, Anasetti C, Jacobsen PB, Jim HSL. The Role of Age in Neurocognitive Functioning among Adult Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplant Recipients. Biol Blood Marrow Tr. 2017 Nov;23(11):1974-1979. Pubmedid: 28797784. Pmcid: PMC5682195.
  • Gonzalez BD, Jim HS, Booth-Jones M, Small BJ, Sutton SK, Lin HY, Park JY, Spiess PE, Fishman MN, Jacobsen PB. Course and Predictors of Cognitive Function in Patients With Prostate Cancer Receiving Androgen-Deprivation Therapy: A Controlled Comparison. J Clin Oncol. 2015 Jun;33(18):2021-2027. Pubmedid: 25964245. Pmcid: PMC4461804.
  • Brem S, Meyers CA, Palmer G, Booth-Jones M, Jain S, Ewend MG. Preservation of neurocognitive function and local control of 1 to 3 brain metastases treated with surgery and carmustine wafers. Cancer. 2013 Nov;119(21):3830-3838. Pubmedid: 24037801. Pmcid: PMC4209121.
  • Jim HS, Small B, Hartman S, Franzen J, Millay S, Phillips K, Jacobsen PB, Booth-Jones M, Pidala J. Clinical predictors of cognitive function in adults treated with hematopoietic cell transplantation. Cancer. 2012 Jul;118(13):3407-3416. Pubmedid: 22139882. Pmcid: PMC3297700.
  • Jim HS, Boyd TD, Booth-Jones M, Pidala J, Potter H. Granulocyte Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor Treatment is Associated with Improved Cognition in Cancer Patients. Brain Disord Ther. 2012.1(1). Pubmedid: 22905341. Pmcid: PMC3422132.
  • Wells KJ, Booth-Jones M, Jacobsen PB. Do coping and social support predict depression and anxiety in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation?. J Psychosoc Oncol. 2009;27(3):297-315. Pubmedid: 19544178. Pmcid: PMC3866098.
  • Gross-King M, Booth-Jones M, Couluris M. Neurocognitive impairment in children treated for cancer: how do we measure cognitive outcomes?. J Pediatr Oncol Nurs. 2008 Sep.25(4):227-232. Pubmedid: 18559886.
  • Jacobs S, Small B, Booth-Jones M, Jacobsen P, Fields K. Changes in cognitive functioning in the year after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Cancer. 2007 Oct;110(7):1560-1567. Pubmedid: 17685391.
  • Jacobs S, Jacobsen P, Booth-Jones M, Wagner L, Anasetti C. Evaluation of the functional assessment of cancer therapy cognitive scale with hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients. J Pain Symptom Manag. 2007 Jan;33(1):13-23. Pubmedid: 17196903.
  • Ransom S, Jacobsen P, Booth-Jones M. Validation of the Distress Thermometer with bone marrow transplant patients. Psychooncology. 2006 Jul;15(7):604-612. Pubmedid: 16208733.
  • Fox S, Mitchell S, Booth-Jones M. Cognitive impairment in patients with brain tumors: assessment and intervention in the clinic setting. Clin J Oncol Nurs. 2006 Apr;10(2):169-176. Pubmedid: 16708701.
  • Booth-Jones M, Jacobsen P, Ransom S, Soety E. Characteristics and correlates of cognitive functioning following bone marrow transplantation. Bone Marrow Transplant. 2005 Oct;36(8):695-702. Pubmedid: 16086044.
  • Extermann M, Chen H, Booth-Jones M, Meyer J, Balducci L, Jacobsen P. Pilot testing of the computerized cognitive test Microcog in chemotherapy-treated older cancer patients. Crit Rev Oncol Hematol. 2005 May;54(2):137-143. Pubmedid: 15843096.
  • Widows M, Jacobsen P, Booth-Jones M, Fields K. Predictors of posttraumatic growth following bone marrow transplantation for cancer. Health Psychol. 2005 May;24(3):266-273. Pubmedid: 15898862.
  • Weitzner M, Kanfer S, Booth-Jones M. Apathy and pituitary disease: it has nothing to do with depression. J Neuropsychiatry Clin Neurosci. 2005 Apr;17(2):159-166. Pubmedid: 15939968.
  • Jacobsen P, Garland L, Booth-Jones M, Donovan K, Thors C, Winters E, Grendys E. Relationship of hemoglobin levels to fatigue and cognitive functioning among cancer patients receiving chemotherapy. J Pain Symptom Manag. 2004 Jul;28(1):7-18. Pubmedid: 15223080.
  • Sadler I, Jacobsen P, Booth-Jones M, Belanger H, Weitzner M, Fields K. Preliminary evaluation of a clinical syndrome approach to assessing cancer-related fatigue. J Pain Symptom Manag. 2002 May;23(5):406-416. Pubmedid: 12007758.
  • Jacobsen PB, Sadler IJ, Booth-Jones M, Soety E, Weitzner MA, Fields KK. Predictors of posttraumatic stress disorder symptomatology following bone marrow transplantation for cancer. J Consult Clin Psychol. 2002 Feb;70(1):235-240. Pubmedid: 11860050.

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