November Marks Pancreatic Cancer Awareness Month

November 05, 2009

Moffitt Cancer Center Experts Available For Comment

WHAT:            Moffitt physicians are available to discuss the latest on pancreatic cancer prevention, screening, treatment and research.

WHO:              Mokenge P. Malafa, M.D., chief of the Gastrointestinal Oncology Program

                        Catherine Chodkiewicz, M.D., assistant member of the gastrointestinal tumor program

                        James F. Helm, M.D., Ph.D., associate member of the gastrointestinal tumor program

                        Pamela J. Hodul, MD, assistant member of the gastrointestinal tumor program

                        Richard C. Karl, MD, senior member of the gastrointestinal tumor program

                        Jason B. Klapman, MD, assistant member of the gastrointestinal tumor program

                        Larry K. Kvols, MD, senior member of the gastrointestinal tumor program

                        David Shibata, MD, associate member of the gastrointestinal tumor program

                        Gregory M. Springett, MD, PhD, assistant member of the gastrointestinal tumor program

                        Jonathan R. Strosberg, MD, assistant member of the gastrointestinal tumor program

                        Timothy J. Yeatman, MD, senior member of the gastrointestinal tumor program

CONTACT:       Patty Kim, media relations coordinator, can be reached at (813) 745-7322 or patty.kim@moffitt.org.

STATISTICS:    One in 72 men and women will be diagnosed with cancer of the pancreas during their lifetime. In 2009, an estimated 21,050 men and 21,420 women will be diagnosed with the cancer, and 35,240 will die.

                        Risk factors for developing pancreatic cancer include smoking; long-standing diabetes; chronic pancreatitis; and certain hereditary conditions such as hereditary pancreatitis, multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 syndrome, hereditary nonpolyposis colon cancer (HNPCC; Lynch syndrome), von Hippel-Lindau syndrome, ataxia-telangiectasia, and the familial atypical multiple mole melanoma syndrome (FAMMM).

                        Possible signs of pancreatic cancer include jaundice, pain in the upper or middle abdomen and back, unexplained weight loss, loss of appetite and fatigue. The disease is difficult to detect because there are no noticeable signs or symptoms in the early stages, the symptoms are similar to signs of many other illnesses and the pancreas is hidden behind other organs.

RESOURCES:   Moffitt Cancer Center

Lifetime Cancer Screening & Prevention Center

                        General Information About Pancreatic Cancer                     

                        Moffitt Support Groups

                        Clinical Trials

Total Cancer Care

                        Cancer Answers

Moffitt Events Calendar