February 26, 2016

February 26, 2016

Old red dye shows promise as new cancer foe
Daily News 7/24 – Feb. 26
"This is one of the really neat examples of what we call repurposing, taking drugs that been around for years ... and suddenly realizing that they may have an oncologic value," said Dr. Vernon Sondak, head of cutaneous oncology at the Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa, Florida. 

Corante injetável pode encolher tumores e reduzir a propagação do cancro de pele
Sic Noticias – Feb. 26
Investigadores do Moffitt Cancer Center, nos EUA, demonstraram que um corante injectável, conhecido como PV-10, pode encolher tumores e reduzir a propagação do cancro da pele.

Tax collector supports variety of specialty plates
TBO – Feb. 26
Some existing plates, including colleges and universities, would be exempt, such as Moffitt Cancer Center, American Legion, Big Brothers Big Sisters and Fallen Law Enforcement.

Survival of the Fittest: Oncology Could Gain From Chemotherapy's Selective Force
AJMC – Feb. 25
A new study has raised questions about the maximum-tolerated-dose (MTD) paradigm in cancer. Using a breast cancer xenograft model, researchers from the Lee Moffitt Cancer Center took advantage of low-dose chemotherapy to apply brakes to a tumor’s resistance mechanism, rather than trying to destroy the tumor with a much higher dose—as is the norm with MTD.

WIRED Awake: 10 must-read articles for 25 February
Wired U.K. – Feb. 25
Scientists from the H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute in Florida, USA, carried out experiments on mice with breast cancer and found that continuous low-dose chemotherapy shrunk tumours without leaving behind drug-resistant cells that, in standard chemotherapy, tend to grow out of control after treatment ends.

Moffitt develops novel cancer treatment to inhibit chemo-resistance
Medical News Today – Feb. 25
Moffitt Cancer Center researchers hope to improve treatment outcomes with development of a novel therapeutic strategy, called adaptive therapy, which is based on evolutionary principals and aims to keep resistant cells in check by maintaining a population of chemo-sensitive cells.

Controlling Cancer May Be Better Then Getting Rid of it Entirely
TIME Magazine – Feb. 25
A team led by Dr. Robert Gatenby, chair of radiology and co-director of the cancer biology and evolution program at Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, say that the current approach of using aggressive chemotherapy to try to eliminate every last cancer cell goes against basic evolutionary principles — rules that even tumor cells follow.

Adaptive therapy may be more effective than tumor eradication
Health Times – Feb. 25
A team of US scientists led by Dr Robert Gatenby, from the H Lee Moffitt Cancer Centre and Research Institute in Tampa, Florida, conducted tests using the chemotherapy drug paclitaxel to treat mice with two kinds of breast cancer.

Controlling Cancer Could Be Better Than Destroying It Completely, Scientists Suggest
The Huffington Post UK – Feb. 25
Lead researcher Dr Robert Gatenby, from Moffitt Cancer Centre and Research Institute in Florida, said he was "surprised" by the findings. "We propose that by eliminating all of the sensitive cells and leaving only the resistant cells behind, this approach actually results in the most rapid possible tumour progression," he said.

Controlling Cancer With Low-Dose Chemo Better Than Killing It
Tech Times – Feb. 25
"We tend to think of cancers as a competition between the tumor and the host, but at the level of the cancer cell, cancer cells are mostly competing with each other," said Dr. Robert Gatenby of the Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, who led the research.

Provectus Biopharmaceuticals Announces Data on PV-10 and Co-Inhibitory Blockade to Be Presented at American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2016
PharmaVoice.com – Feb. 25
The poster presentation is titled, “T Cell Mediated Immunity after Combination Therapy with Intralesional PV-10 and Co-Inhibitory Blockade in a Melanoma Model.” Scheduled for presentation at Section 26 of the exhibition area, the data are from a team of researchers at the H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa, led by Dr. Shari Pilon-Thomas.

There’s a new approach to fighting cancer: keeping cancer cells alive
Science alert – Feb. 25
"[T]here is a natural tendency to use high-dose therapy based on the assumption that each patient receives maximum benefit by killing as many cancer cells as possible," said oncologist Robert Gatenby from the Moffitt Cancer Centre in Florida.

Low-Dose chemo may keep cancer under control: Study
Business Standard – Feb. 25
Researchers at the Moffitt Cancer Centre in US hope to improve treatment outcomes with development of a therapeutic strategy, called adaptive therapy, which is based on evolutionary principals and aims to keep resistant cells in check by maintaining a population of chemo-sensitive cells.

Study shows low-dose chemo keeps cancer under control
CTV News – Feb. 25
"Our results suggest that this adaptive therapeutic strategy... can result in prolonged progression-free survival in breast cancer," said the study, authored by Pedro Enriquez-Navas and colleagues at the H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute in Tampa, Florida.

Cancer: Low doses of chemotherapy ‘may control disease more effectively’
Independent UK – Feb. 25
“The study is meant to question the conventional paradigm that has prevailed in cancer therapy for over 50 years – namely, that the best patient benefit is achieved by delivering drugs at the highest possible doses even when mortality of the treatment can reach 5 per cent,” said Robert Gatenby of the H Lee Moffitt Cancer Centre and Research Institute in Tampa, Florida. 

New research shows low-dose chemo keeps cancer under control
The British Journal – Feb. 25
Despite numerous advances in oncology since the War on Cancer began, many patients develop resistance to standard therapies and eventually relapse. Moffitt Cancer Center researchers hope to improve treatment outcomes with development of a novel therapeutic strategy, called adaptive therapy, which is based on evolutionary principals and aims to keep resistant cells in check by maintaining a population of chemo-sensitive cells.

Learning to live with cancer is more effective than killing it, say scientists
The Independent – Feb. 25
A team of US scientists led by Dr Robert Gatenby, from the H Lee Moffitt Cancer Centre and Research Institute in Tampa, Florida, conducted tests using the chemotherapy drug paclitaxel to treat mice with two different kinds of breast cancer.

Designer Dianne Davant looks to St. Lucie River for inspiration in remodel of her Palm City home
Stuart Magazine – March 2016
The designer says one of her biggest design challenges so far has been the renovation of the Palm City home she shares with her husband, H. Lee Moffitt.  

Controlling cancer may be better than trying to kill it
Irish Examiner – Feb. 24
A team of US scientists led by Dr Robert Gatenby, from the H Lee Moffitt Cancer Centre and Research Institute in Tampa, Florida, conducted tests using the chemotherapy drug paclitaxel to treat mice with two different kinds of breast cancer.

Technique Unveiled to Control Cancer Rather Than Kill It
Healthline – Feb. 24
In their experiments, researchers led by Pedro M. Enriquez-Navas, PhD, of the Moffitt Cancer Center in Florida used different treatments on a small sampling of mice that had one of two forms of breast cancer.

Controlar el cáncer sin 'matarlo'
El Mundo – Feb. 24
Un enfoque novedoso y hasta revolucionario para el tratamiento del cáncer. En lugar de 'matar' al mayor número posible de células cancerígenas con la quimioterapia tradicional a dosis elevadas, mantener su crecimiento controlado con dosis de 'quimio' más bajas. Un grupo de científicos del Centro de Cáncer eInstituto de Investigación H. Lee Moffitt Tampa (Florida, Estados Unidos) se plantea esta inédita estrategia con el objetivo de alcanzar mejores resultados en comparación con los actuales.

¿Estamos preparados para convivir con el cáncer?
ABC Salud – Feb. 24
Tal es así que investigadores del Centro Oncológico e Instituto de Investigación H. Lee Moffitt en Tampa (EE.UU.) plantean un nuevo enfoque terapéutico:administrar la quimioterapia de forma frecuente y en dosis muy inferiores a las máximas que puede tolerar el paciente para, en la medida de los posible, minimizar los efectos adversos y, si bien no erradicar el tumor, sí tener su crecimiento bajo control.

Gentler attack on cancer may mean we can live with it for longer
New Scientist – Feb. 24
Robert Gatenby at Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa, Florida, believes he has a better strategy: keep some treatment-responsive cells alive so they compete with the resistant cells and stop them from taking over. The premise is based on the idea that acquiring resistance genes must come at a cost to the cell and make them weaker in other ways.

Radical cancer treatment seeks to control rather than destroy tumours
The Guardian – Feb. 24
Writing in the journal Science Translational Medicine, Robert Gatenby at the H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa, Florida, describes how his team tested the idea with the chemotherapy drug paclitaxel (or taxol) in mice with two different forms of breast cancer.

Living with cancer might be better than trying to cure it
Newsy  - Feb. 24
The idea comes from researchers at the Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa, Florida. In a new study, they used what they call "adaptive therapy" to keep breast cancer in mice in check.

Tradition continues as Miss Tampa is crowned Saturday
Tampa Tribune – Feb. 23
Saturday night, the 23-year-old relinquishes her crown to a 2016 Miss Tampa just as she begins her career as a floor nurse at Moffitt Cancer Center. 

NCCN is ‘vague,’ so study clarifies H&N Cancer follow-up
Medscape – Feb. 23
For post-treatment follow-up, including recurrence detection, "the NCCN guidelines are one-size-fits-all," said Jessica Frakes, MD, a radiation oncologist at the Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute in Tampa, Florida. 

2016 Head and Neck Cancer Symposium: Most Recurrences of HPV-Positive Oropharyngeal Cancer Can Be Found Within 6 Months
ASCO Post – Feb. 22
“For most patients with HPV-associated oropharynx cancer, after a negative 3-month PET scan, physical exams with history and direct visualization are sufficient to find recurrences,” said Jessica M. Frakes, MD, Assistant Member of the Department of Radiation Oncology at the H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center. “Minimizing the number of unnecessary tests may alleviate the financial and emotional burden on these patients, including overall health-care costs, time spent away from work and family, and the anxiety of waiting for scan results.”

Study determines key recurrence detection time for oropharyngeal cancer
Bright Surf – Feb. 22
"For most patients with HPV-associated oropharynx cancer, after a negative three-month PET scan, physical exams with history and direct visualization are sufficient to find recurrences," said Jessica M. Frakes, MD, an assistant member of the department of radiation oncology at the H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa and lead author on the study

FDA Orphan Designated Drug for Mesothelioma In Trial With Combination Therapy To Assess Increased Efficacy
Mesothelioma Help – Feb. 22
“Combination therapy with durvalumab and tremelimumab demonstrated antitumor activity in patients with NSCLC regardless of PD-L1 status, including in patients with no evidence of tumor cell membrane PD-L1 staining,” lead author, Scott J. Antonia, MD, PhD, chair of the Department of Thoracic Oncology at Moffitt Cancer Center, said in a statement, according to a Feb. 12 article in OncLive. 

Management of Primary Refractory AML
OncLive – Feb. 22
Rami S. Komrokji, MD: I think you mentioned the key point, Ruben, that basically the time of relapse is one of the most important points. Like some would include that a relapse within the first six months is really refractory AML. And what the studies have shown is that the most predictable factor for a second remission is really the duration of first remission. So for those patients that their disease relapses after a year or two years, I think we have a really decent chance to get the patients back into remission.

Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Treatment Discontinuation
OncLive – Feb. 22
Javier Pinilla-Ibarz, MD, PhD: I completely agree. In most of the data that has been shown, almost 90% of the patients will, if they’re going to lose the response, it’s going to happen in the first six months. However, I want to emphasize what Jorge would say and in the past we used to say: TKI discontinuation, don’t try at home. So, I think we need to still emphasize that this is something that has to be done in clinical trials where there is very, very good monitoring. I think after so many years, really emphasizing adherence and asking patients to take the drug, we cannot really let this happen really outside these settings because it may be, as Kevin said, quite devastating.

Metastatic Colorectal Cancer: Goals of Resection
OncLive- Feb. 22
Richard Kim, MD: I agree with Tony’s point that only patient that we would resect upfront is if they’re symptomatic, they’re bleeding, they’re near obstruction. They are the only patients we would take to the surgery. Otherwise, I agree, in an asymptomatic patient, the data is not out there so we will start with chemotherapy first and see what happens.

Immune-Targeting Drug Combo Shows Promise for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients, Say Moffitt Cancer Center Researchers
Health Canal – Feb. 21
Moffitt Cancer Center researchers are leading the way in the creation of novel therapies. Most recently, Moffitt, in conjunction with partner institutions, initiated a multicenter phase 1b clinical trial to determine the safety and efficacy of a new drug combination for non-small cell lung cancer that stimulates a patient’s immune system to target and kill cancer cells.  

After Decades of Research, Potential for TILs in Melanoma Is Higher Than Ever
Targeted Oncology – Feb. 20
Research into TILs began in the 1980s at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), where Weber was a fellow at the time. Today, TIL technology is being used at 8 locations worldwide, including the NCI, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, and the Moffitt Cancer Center in the United States.

Recurrence Detection Time for Oropharyngeal Cancer Determined
MedIndia – Feb. 20
"For most patients with HPV-associated oropharynx cancer, after a negative three-month PET scan, physical exams with history and direct visualization are sufficient to find recurrences," said Jessica M. Frakes, MD, an assistant member of the department of radiation oncology at the H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa and lead author on the study.

Imaging, exams detect majority of HPV-positive oropharyngeal cancer recurrences
HemOnc Today – Feb. 19
“We wanted to determine when these patients fail and also when they have side effects so we know how to guide our optimal follow-up schedule,”Jessica M. Frakes, MD, assistant member of the department of radiation oncology at H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa, Florida, said during a press briefing.

Innovative fertility preservation strategies and programs for young adults with cancer
Oncology Nurse Advisor – Feb. 19
At the Moffitt Cancer Center, simply providing educational brochures to newly diagnosed cancer patients of childbearing age raised the number of patient calls to the partner reproductive endocrinology center by ninefold, to a high of 27%.

H&N Cancer Recurs Early: Curb Follow-up Imaging?
MedPage Today – Feb. 19
The findings suggest that patients with negative PET-CT imaging results at 3 months can be followed thereafter with clinical evaluation and a physical examination that includes direct visual inspection, Jessica M. Frakes, MD, of Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa, Fla., reported at the Multidisciplinary Head and Neck Cancer Symposium in Scottsdale, Ariz. Toxicity also tended to occur early.

Prostate cancer patients undergoing androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) experience hot flashes
Bel Marra Health- Feb. 19
ADT is a common treatment for prostate cancer in its advanced stage, yet nearly 80 percent of ADT patients experience hot flashes. Researchers from Moffitt Cancer Center looked to explore why the phenomenon may occur and determine genetic factors along with other characteristics that would determine why some men experience hot flashes while on ADT and others do not.

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