August 14, 2015

Jimmy Carter’s cancer: President Obama says former US President is ‘as resilient as they come’
International Business Times – Aug. 14
Dr. Lodovico Balducci said that age was not a factor in treating cancer successfully. “A man 90 years old normally would have a life expectancy of two or three years, but Jimmy Carter is probably much younger than that,” Newsday quoted the specialist on treating cancer in the elderly at the Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa, “If he tolerated liver surgery, I imagine he has a relatively good tolerance.”

What Cancer Does Jimmy Carter Have? The Former President Has A Family History
Bustle – Aug. 14
Carter’s age and the type of cancer he has will be among the factors to determine what type of treatment he receives, and so will the state of his health. Dr. Lodovico Balducci, a cancer specialist at the Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa, Florida, told the AP that since Carter tolerated the liver surgery which led to the cancer’s discovery, he may be able to tolerate some cancer treatments, despite his advanced age.

‘Churchgoing may benefit health’
Church Times – Aug. 14
This association was particularly strong in patients who “experienced greater emotional aspects of religion and spirituality, including a sense of meaning and purpose in life as well as a connection to a source larger than oneself,” the lead author, Dr Heather Jim, of the Moffitt Cancer Center, in Florida, said.

Religion News: Spirituality may benefit cancer patients, study shows
GrandLakeNews.com – Aug. 14
“Cancer patients who reported higher meaning, purpose, and spiritual connection in life also reported better physical health, as did patients who reported more positive religious or spiritual explanations for the cancer (versus a sense of fatalism or anger towards God),” explained research leader Heather Jim of Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa, Florida.

Location, extent of Carter's cancer will govern his options
The Associated Press – Aug. 13
The key to informed decision-making is to understand the patient’s goals, said Dr. Lodovico Balducci, a specialist on treating cancer in the elderly at the Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa.Many people want to try everything possible to gain even a small amount of extra time.

Doctors: Various factors figure into Carter cancer treatment
The Associated Press – Aug. 13
Age by itself does not preclude successful cancer treatment, said Dr. Lodovico Balducci, a specialist on treating cancer in the elderly at the Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa. Much depends on the patient’s “biological” age versus his actual years, he said.

Jimmy Carter says he has cancer, revealed by recent surgery
The Associated Press – Aug. 13
Age by itself does not preclude successful cancer treatment, said Dr. Lodovico Balducci, a specialist on treating cancer in the elderly at the Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa. Much depends on the patient's “biological” age versus his actual years, he said. “A man 90 years old normally would have a life expectancy of two or three years, but Jimmy Carter is probably much younger than that" in terms of his function,” Balducci said. “If he tolerated liver surgery I imagine he has a relatively good tolerance” to other treatments that might be tried. For example, Moffitt has developed a scoring system to estimate how well an older person would tolerate chemotherapy, and the risk of serious side effects.

Carter’s cancer: More options than ever for treating aging patients
The Atlanta Journal-Constitution – Aug. 13
Aging patients with other conditions, such as diabetes or heart disease, may not be able to tolerate the same kinds of chemotherapy or other treatments that younger people can, according to Dr. Lodovico Balducci, whose team focuses on adult cancers at Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa, has developed an assessment to help doctors tailor treatment to an older person.

Jimmy Carter’s diagnosis at 90 highlights challenges of treating cancer in older Americans
The Kansas City Star – Aug. 13
Referring to Carter’s diagnosis, Lodovico Balducci, a geriatric cancer specialist at the Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa, Fla., told Fox News that old age doesn’t prevent successful cancer treatment.

Jimmy Carter’s Cancer: What’s Next for Him?
Newsmax Health – Aug. 13
Lodovico Balducci, M.D., a specialist on treating cancer in the elderly at the Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa, told Newsday that age alone does not preclude successful cancer treatment.

Faith in God as cancer fighter: Study links religion and spirituality to better health
Christian Today – Aug. 13
Jim, who comes from the Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa, Florida, said, however, that better health is not tied to any particular religion.

Tasty E-Cigs Popular, Scientifically Uncertain
WUSF News and WGCU, NPR Fort Myers – Aug. 13
At the H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa, Dr. Thomas Brandon is trying to see if electronic cigarettes really are effective at helping people quit tobacco. He said unlike traditional nicotine replacements like gum or patches, smokers find e-cigarettes comforting.

Genetic test is first to predict sensitivity of colon cancer metastases to radiation therapy
Oncology Nurse Advisor – Aug. 13
Recent advances in the understanding of cancer have led to more personalized therapies, such as drugs that target particular proteins and tests that analyze gene expression patterns in tumors to predict a patient’s response to therapy. This research, from the Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa, Florida, brings a personalized approach to radiation treatment.

New targeted treatments benefit leukemia patients
VeroNews.com – Aug. 13
In acute leukemia, the abnormal blood cells don’t carry out their normal functions and they multiply quickly, leading to a rapid worsening of the disease. Acute leukemia requires aggressive, timely treatment. Dr. Weeks says he refers these cases to a center that has experience in evaluating and treating this form of the disease, such as the H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute in Tampa.

Faith in God as cancer fighter: Study links religion and spirituality to better health
Christian Today – Aug. 13
“Cancer patients who reported higher meaning, purpose, and spiritual connection in life also reported better physical health, as did patients who reported more positive religious or spiritual explanations for the cancer (versus a sense of fatalism or anger towards God),” research leader Heather Jim explained. Jim, who comes from the Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa, Florida, said, however, that better health is not tied to any particular religion.

Eduardo Moros Recognition
Tampa Bay Business Journal – Aug. 13
Eduardo Moros has been elected a Fellow by the American Association of Physicists in Medicine. This honor recognizes his contributions in research, education and leadership to the medical physics community.

Moffitt surgeon, Shriners hospital unite to save Iowa girl’s arm
The Tampa Tribune – Aug. 12
She recalled reading about Dr. G. Douglas Letson, a sarcoma division chief and director of musculoskeletal tumor and reconstructive surgery at Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa. Letson and his partner, Dr. David Cheong, are said to be the only physicians in the United States who have implanted noninvasive, expandable prostheses in children.

Spirituality May be Tied to Easier Cancer Course
Tempo.co – Aug. 12
Some previous research has found this connection while others have not, said Heather Jim of the Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa, Florida, who led one of the new studies. “Patients should not be pressured into adopting religious or spiritual beliefs,” Jim said.

Religious and spiritual act a comfort for most cancer patients
Sentinel Republic – Aug. 12
For the study, Dr. Jim and her team looked at a number of previously conducted studies with a total number of more than 44.000 patients. Dr. Heather Jim, lead author and expert from the Moffitt Cancer Center (Tampa, Florida), gave a statement saying that “These relationships were particularly strong in patients who experienced greater emotional aspects of religion and spirituality.”

After firing, Lakewood Ranch-based Center for Building Hope faces shaky future
The Bradenton Herald – Aug. 12
Among the Center for Building Hope’s community partners and sponsors are Manatee Community Foundation, Manatee Memorial Hospital, Blake Medical Center, Moffitt Cancer Center, and Renaissance on 9th, according to the center’s website.

University of Hawaii Cancer Center aims to have business plan by October
Pacific Business News – Aug. 12
Cosovich has worked extensively with academic health centers and multiple cancer centers across the U.S., including the Knight Cancer Institute at Oregon Health and Science University, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, and the Moffitt Cancer Center.

Adams & Reese collects $120K
SaintPetersBlog – Aug. 12
Adams & Reese – the one-man lobby shop piloted by former Florida House Speaker H. Lee Moffitt – took in … some $120,000 … around $90,000 of that came from work influencing state lawmakers, with the remaining $30,000 stemming from representation before executive state agencies. The former Tampa representative for whom the renowned Moffitt Cancer Center is named boasted a small but potent roster of clients 

Shibata named UTHSC Chair of Surgery
Memphis Daily News – Aug. 12
For the past 11 years, I have worked at the H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute in Tampa, Fla., where I was a professor of surgery and oncology.

Religious beliefs may be associated with better health in cancer patients
Examiner.com – Aug. 11
“These relationships were particularly strong in patients who experienced greater emotional aspects of religion and spirituality, including a sense of meaning and purpose in life as well as a connection to a source larger than oneself,” said lead author Heather Jim, PhD, of the Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa.

Groundbreaking new study finds cancer patients who believe in God experience less symptoms, greater emotional health
Gospel Herald – Aug. 11
“In addition, some patients struggle with the religious or spiritual significance of their cancer, which is normal,” said Dr. Heather Jim of the Moffitt Cancer Center. “How they resolve their struggle may impact their health, but more research is needed to better understand and support these patients.”

Spirituality plays a big role in cancer management
Youth Health – Aug. 11
Moffitt Cancer Center's Heather Jim, PhD, and her colleagues decided to find out the extent of the impact of a belief in God or spirituality especially on cancer patients. For the study, they went back to numerous researches conducted on the same subject. They were then able to consider more than 42,000 patients.

How religious and spiritual beliefs relate to cancer patients’ physical, mental and social well-being
eCancer News – Aug. 11
“These relationships were particularly strong in patients who experienced greater emotional aspects of religion and spirituality, including a sense of meaning and purpose in life as well as a connection to a source larger than oneself,” said lead author Heather Jim, PhD, of the Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa.

Spirituality helps ease pain of cancer patients
Health Care Asia - Aug. 11
“Patients should not be pressured into adopting religious or spiritual beliefs,” Jim said. “Although our data suggest that patients with greater religion/spirituality tend to have better perceived physical health, these are aggregate-level data.”

Cancer And Religion: Patients With Strong Faith Suffer Cancer Symptoms Less, Says Study
HNGN – Aug. 11
“Cancer patients who reported higher meaning, purpose, and spiritual connection in life reported better physical health, as did patients who reported more positive religious or spiritual explanations for the cancer (versus a sense of fatalism or anger towards God),” said Heather Jim, the lead author of the study from Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa, Fla.

Religious cancer patients ‘cope better’
Times Live – Aug. 11
Researchers said further studies were needed on the long-term link between religion and health and if health-support services should offer believers religious guidance. Heather Jim of the Moffitt Cancer Center said: “In addition, some patients struggle with the religious or spiritual significance of their cancer, which is normal.”

Religious and spiritual act as comfort for most cancer patients
NH Voice – Aug. 11
“These relationships were particularly strong in patients who experienced greater emotional aspects of religion and spirituality, including a sense of meaning and purpose in life as well as a connection to a source larger than oneself,” stated Heather Jim of the Moffitt Cancer Center.

USF, Moffitt team up on study to help breast cancer survivors
83 Degrees - Aug. 11
USF and Moffitt Cancer Center have joined forces in an effort to better the lives of breast cancer survivors. The team equipped with a $2.8 million grant from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) will begin a five-year study on how stress reduction can help repair the cognitive impairment of breast cancer survivors.

Spirituality may be tied to easier cancer course
Reuters – Aug. 10
Some previous research has found this connection while others have not, said Heather Jim of the Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa, Florida, who led one of the new studies. “Patients should not be pressured into adopting religious or spiritual beliefs,” Jim said. “Although our data suggest that patients with greater religion/spirituality tend to have better perceived physical health, these are aggregate-level data.”

Spirituality May Benefit Cancer Patients
HealthDay – Aug. 10
“These relationships were particularly strong in patients who experienced greater emotional aspects of religion and spirituality, including a sense of meaning and purpose in life as well as a connection to a source larger than oneself,” first review lead author Heather Jim, of the Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa, Fla., said in a journal news release.

Cancer And Religion: Faith Can Improve Physical, Mental Health In Patients, Study Says
International Business Times – Aug. 10
“These relationships were particularly strong in patients who experienced greater emotional aspects of religion and spirituality, including a sense of meaning and purpose in life as well as a connection to a source larger than oneself,” lead author Heather Jim of the Moffitt Cancer Center in Florida, said in a press release.

Religious people experience less cancer pain, study finds
Christian Today – Aug. 10
Of the relationship between better physical health and religion, lead author Dr Heather Jim of the Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa, Florida, said that it was “particularly strong in patients who experienced greater emotional aspects of religion and spirituality, including a sense of meaning and purpose in life as well as a connection to a source larger than oneself.”

Spirituality aids health of cancer patients
IrishHealth.com – Aug. 10
“These relationships were particularly strong in patients who experienced greater emotional aspects of religion and spirituality, including a sense of meaning and purpose in life as well as a connection to a source larger than oneself,” explained one of the study’s lead author, Dr Heather Jim, of the Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa, Florida.

How does religion affect the wellbeing of cancer patients?
Medical News Today – Aug. 10
“These relationships were particularly strong in patients who experienced greater emotional aspects of religion and spirituality, including a sense of meaning and purpose in life as well as a connection to a source larger than oneself,” explains lead author Dr. Heather Jim, of the Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa, FL.

Religious people cope better with cancer...unless they think God is punishing them
The Telegraph – Aug. 10
Dr Heather Jim of the Moffitt Cancer Center said: “In addition, some patients struggle with the religious or spiritual significance of their cancer, which is normal. How they resolve their struggle may impact their health, but more research is needed to better understand and support these patients.”

Embrace spirituality to fight cancer
Indo Asian News Service – Aug. 10
“These relationships were particularly strong in patients who experienced greater emotional aspects of religion and spirituality, including a sense of meaning and purpose in life as well as a connection to a source larger than oneself,” explained lead study author Heather Jim from the Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa, Florida.

Editorial: Taking the dive with Cuba
The Tampa Tribune – Aug. 10
Similarly, as Guzzo recently reported, Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa is interested in working with Cuba on some its cancer treatment breakthroughs.

Dr. Alan List Recognition
Tampa Bay Business Journal – Aug. 10
List was chosen as one of three members on the first-ever oncology/hematology Medical Advisory Board to provide strategic medical/scientific advice and counsel to the Strategia Therapeutics board of directors and senior management team.

For cancer survivors, adoption can be next ordeal
Philly.com – Aug. 9
Last month, researchers from the Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa, Fla., published a survey of 77 adoption agencies that found a similarly fuzzy picture. Some agencies required letters from oncologists detailing the survivor's treatment and prognosis or records showing the survivor had been cancer-free for five years, an arbitrary threshold traditionally equated with being cured.

USF targets top local students, closes gap with UF
Sarasota Herald-Tribune – Aug. 9
The school also partners with local hospitals, including Moffitt Cancer Center, James A. Haley Veterans' Hospital and Tampa General, among others. The partnership creates convenient opportunities for Tampa-based medical school students who need to complete internships or residencies.

Editorial: Toss jai alai fronton idea
The Tampa Tribune – Aug. 8
Moreover, a major gambling-entertainment venue, and the low-paying jobs it would bring, would deter investment by high-tech, biomedical, engineering and other high-paying enterprises that should be recruited for the area surrounding USF, the Moffitt Cancer Center, the James A. Haley Veterans’ Hospital and Florida Hospital Tampa.

Cancer survivors may face challenges during adoption process
HemOnc Today – Aug. 7
Gwendolyn Quinn, PhD, senior member of Moffitt Cancer Center’s health outcomes and behavior program, director of the Moffitt survey methods core and professor at University of South Florida College of Medicine, and colleagues asked oncology nurses participating in a training program to conduct interviews on this topic with adoption agencies.

Understanding the stress of Latina cancer patients
Oncology Nurse Advisor – Aug. 7
Cancer is the leading cause of death among the Latino population, and an estimated 1 in 3 Latina women will cope with a cancer diagnosis at some point in her life. Because cultural differences influence stress perception, researchers at the University of South Florida and the Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa, Florida, undertook a study to evaluate the stressors these women experienced. 

Longtime pharma vet Bob Ingram joins Durham-based BioCryst’s board
Triangle Business Journal – Aug. 6
Ingram also sits on the board of Durham-based Cree, Inc., (Nasdaq: CREE) and is a member of the boards for the James B. Hunt Jr. Institute for Educational Leadership and Policy, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, CEO Roundtable on Cancer, Research Triangle Institute and Chairman, and the GlaxoSmithKline Foundation. 

Biomarker Signature May Predict Aggressive Disease in African American Men With Prostate Cancer
The ASCO Post – Aug. 6
Kosj Yamoah, MD, PhD, of Moffitt Cancer Center, is the corresponding author for the Journal of Clinical Oncology article.

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