Can Invasive Ductal Carcinoma Occur With Other Types of Breast Cancer?

Invasive ductal carcinoma is one of the most common types of breast cancer, accounting for approximately 80 percent of all diagnoses. This malignancy occurs when cancerous cells that originally form in a duct, which carries milk from a lobule to the nipple, spread beyond the walls of the duct and into the surrounding breast tissue or lymph nodes.

Invasive ductal carcinoma and ductal carcinoma in situ

In many patients with invasive ductal carcinoma, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) may also be present. DCIS is a form of non-invasive breast cancer in which the cancerous cells are contained within the milk ducts and have not spread to other tissues. DCIS is often referred to as pre-cancerous or pre-invasive. If left untreated, DCIS can become invasive, spreading to nearby breast tissue. It is important to note that ductal carcinoma in situ can exist on its own, without the presence of invasive ductal carcinoma.

Breast cancer treatment at Moffitt Cancer Center

At Moffitt Cancer Center, our Don & Erika Wallace Comprehensive Breast Program includes medical oncologists, surgical oncologists, radiation oncologists and others who focus exclusively on the diagnosis and treatment of breast malignancies. There are many different types of breast cancer, and each patient at Moffitt receives an individualized treatment plan that addresses the unique size, stage and location of his or her tumor, providing the best chance of achieving a favorable outcome and an improved quality of life. We also have plastic surgeons, breast reconstruction experts and fertility preservation specialists available in the same location, should a patient elect these services.

To learn about the invasive ductal carcinoma treatment options that are available to you at Moffitt, call 1-888-663-3488 or submit a new patient registration form online to request an appointment. You do not need a referral to come to Moffitt.