Margaret Booth-Jones, PhD

Where You Are:
Margaret Booth-Jones, PhD

Associate Member

"My research has focused on cognitive changes associated with cancer and cancer treatment and the impact on quality of life and emotional well-being."

Office  (888) 663-3488

Education And Training
  • Fellow, University of Florida, 1995 - Clinical and Health Psychology
  • PhD, University of Florida, 1995 - Clinical and Health Psychology
  • Intern, University of Chicago Medical Center, 1994 - Psychiatry
  • MS, University of Florida, 1991 - Clinical and Health Psychology
  • BS, University of Florida, 1986 - Neurobiology


Dr. Booth-Jones' research focuses on cognitive changes in cancer patients and their subsequent impact on psychosocial function and emotional well-being. She also is interested in the impact of these cognitive changes on caregivers and the family system. The goal of this work is to use neuropsychological and psychological knowledge and methods to identify and treat cancer-related cognitive morbidity and maximize quality of life during and after cancer care. Over the past few years, Dr. Booth-Jones has conducted or participated in several studies investigating the cognitive changes observed during cancer treatment and the long-term consequences of cancer treatment on cognitive function and on returning to premorbid roles.

Dr. Booth-Jones has focused much of her research on patients undergoing bone marrow transplantation and their functioning in the first year following transplant. Her objective is to determine the trajectory of recovery and identify psychosocial and medical variables that have an impact on recovery of premorbid abilities and return to pretransplant psychological state.

Dr. Booth-Jones' other research interests include the practical aspects of neuropsychological testing in a cancer setting, the use of computerized testing batteries in the senior adult population, and the use of computerized driving evaluations to assist with determining driving ability of patients with brain tumors or cognitive changes associated with opiate use. Studies in these areas would have both clinical and research applications.

  • Brem S, Meyers CA, Palmer G, Booth-Jones M, Jain S, Ewend MG. Preservation of neurocognitive function and local control of 1 to 3 brain metastases treated with surgery and carmustine wafers. Cancer. 2013 Nov;119(21):3830-3838. Pubmedid: 24037801. Pmcid: PMC4209121.
  • Jim HS, Boyd TD, Booth-Jones M, Pidala J, Potter H. Granulocyte Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor Treatment is Associated with Improved Cognition in Cancer Patients. Brain Disord Ther. 2012 Aug;1(1). Pubmedid: 22905341.
  • Jim HS, Small B, Hartman S, Franzen J, Millay S, Phillips K, Jacobsen PB, Booth-Jones M, Pidala J. Clinical predictors of cognitive function in adults treated with hematopoietic cell transplantation. Cancer. 2012 Jul;118(13):3407-3416. Pubmedid: 22139882. Pmcid: PMC3297700.
  • Wells KJ, Booth-Jones M, Jacobsen PB. Do coping and social support predict depression and anxiety in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation?. J Psychosoc Oncol. 2009;27(3):297-315. Pubmedid: 19544178. Pmcid: PMC3866098.
  • Gross-King M, Booth-Jones M, Couluris M. Neurocognitive impairment in children treated for cancer: how do we measure cognitive outcomes?. J Pediatr Oncol Nurs. 2008 Sep;25(4):227-232. Pubmedid: 18559886.
  • Jacobs S, Small B, Booth-Jones M, Jacobsen P, Fields K. Changes in cognitive functioning in the year after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Cancer. 2007 Oct;110(7):1560-7. Pubmedid: 17685391.
  • Jacobs S, Jacobsen P, Booth-Jones M, Wagner L, Anasetti C. Evaluation of the functional assessment of cancer therapy cognitive scale with hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients. J Pain Symptom Manage. 2007 Jan;33(1):13-23. Pubmedid: 17196903.
  • Ransom S, Jacobsen P, Booth-Jones M. Validation of the Distress Thermometer with bone marrow transplant patients. Psychooncology. 2006 Jul;15(7):604-612. Pubmedid: 16208733.
  • Fox S, Mitchell S, Booth-Jones M. Cognitive impairment in patients with brain tumors: assessment and intervention in the clinic setting. Clin J Oncol Nurs. 2006 Apr;10(2):169-176. Pubmedid: 16708701.
  • Booth-Jones M, Jacobsen P, Ransom S, Soety E. Characteristics and correlates of cognitive functioning following bone marrow transplantation. Bone Marrow Transplant. 2005 Oct;36(8):695-702. Pubmedid: 16086044.
  • Extermann M, Chen H, Booth-Jones M, Meyer J, Balducci L, Jacobsen P. Pilot testing of the computerized cognitive test Microcog in chemotherapy-treated older cancer patients. Crit Rev Oncol Hematol. 2005 May;54(2):137-143. Pubmedid: 15843096.
  • Widows M, Jacobsen P, Booth-Jones M, Fields K. Predictors of post traumatic growth following bone marrow transplantation for cancer. Health Psychol. 2005 May;24(3):266-273. Pubmedid: 15898862.
  • Weitzner M, Kanfer S, Booth-Jones M. Apathy and pituitary disease: it has nothing to do with depression. J Neuropsychiatry Clin Neurosci. 2005 Apr;17(2):159-166. Pubmedid: 15939968.
  • Jacobsen P, Garland L, Booth-Jones M, Donovan K, Thors C, Winters E, Grendys E. Relationship of hemoglobin levels to fatigue and cognitive functioning among cancer patients receiving chemothereapy. J Pain Symptom Manage. 2004;28(1):7-18. Pubmedid: 15223080.
  • Sadler I, Jacobsen P, Booth-Jones M, Belanger H, Weitzner M, Fields K. Preliminary evaluation of a clinical syndrome approach to assessing cancer-related fatigue. J Pain Symptom Manage. 2002 May;23(5):406-416. Pubmedid: 12007758.
  • Jacobsen PB, Sadler IJ, Booth-Jones M, Soety E, Weitzner MA, Fields KK. Predictors of posttraumatic stress disorder symptomatology following bone marrow transplantation for cancer. J Consult Clin Psychol. 2002 Feb;70(1):235-240. Pubmedid: 11860050.
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