Press Releases | 2013

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Certain Types of Graft-Versus-Host Disease May Increase Risk of Death, Moffitt Cancer Center Researcher Says

Jun 17, 2013

TAMPA, Fla.  – Joseph Pidala, M.D., M.S., assistant member of the Blood and Bone Marrow Transplant and Immunology programs at Moffitt Cancer Center, and colleagues from the Chronic Graft-Versus-Host Disease Consortium have determined that certain gastrointestinal and liver-related types of chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) are associated with worsened quality of life and death.

Their study appeared in the May issue of Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, the official journal of the American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation.
 
GVHD is a complication that can occur when a transplant patient receives stem cells or bone marrow from a donor. The transplanted cells regard the recipient’s body as foreign and attack, causing symptoms ranging from nausea and skin rashes to fatigue and pain. Patients with GVHD are prescribed drugs to suppress their immune system to counteract the disease.

The researchers studied data from 567 patients to determine if the characteristics and symptoms of chronic GVHD were associated with major clinical outcomes, such as quality of life and death. They looked specifically at the site of gastrointestinal tract involvement and liver abnormalities.

“We found important differences in outcomes in relation to gastrointestinal and liver involvement,” Pidala said. “Those with elevated bilirubin (a substance in bile) levels, higher gastrointestinal scores, or lower gastrointestinal involvement had an increased risk of death under current treatment approaches.”

The authors concluded that their findings will help physicians better define a patient’s risk of complications and death after chronic GVHD diagnosis and treatment.

The study was supported by federal grants CA 118953 and U54 A1 083028.

About Moffitt Cancer Center
Located in Tampa, Moffitt is one of only 41 National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Centers, a distinction that recognizes Moffitt’s excellence in research, its contributions to clinical trials, prevention and cancer control. Since 1999, Moffitt has been listed in U.S. News & World Report as one of “America’s Best Hospitals” for cancer. With more than 4,200 employees, Moffitt has an economic impact on the state of nearly $2 billion. For more information, visit MOFFITT.org, and follow the Moffitt momentum on Facebook, twitter and YouTube.

Media release by Florida Science Communications

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